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Archeological finding Uncategorized Мало Црниће
BRADAČA MONASTERY
Manastir bradaca (1) 1387989972
Manastir bradaca (2) 1387989975 Manastir bradaca (3) 1387989977

The Archeological Site (1984)

Bradača monastery complex is located on the wooded hill sides of Kožuh Hill and in Bradača creek plain, away from the main road directions leading towards Mlava and Vitovnica.

Dedicated to the Annunciation, the church was probably built at the end of XIV and the beginning of XV century. It was first mentioned in historical sources in 1566, when prior Pankratije was sitting the monastery. Afterwards, it is mentioned in Turkish defterleri, and in 1676 it was visited by patriarch Arsenije Crnojević III who found the monastery in a devastated condition. All latter mentioning show that the monastery was never renovated again afterwards. The legend connects the monastery occurrence with the cult of Jelica whose tragic destiny was described in a poem “God never orders what He can’t pay for“.

During 1985 and 1986, the Regional Institute for the Smederevo Monuments of Culture Protection made systematic archaeological research of the church remains. The church walls were preserved up to 3m height. The church had a proper architectural orientation with an altar in the east, triconchal base and a narthex separated with pilasters from the nave. The church dimensions are 13х7,5m. It was built of crushed and hewn stone with lime mortar bind. During the archaeological research, some parts of the Holy Table, brick floor, five graves, fresco – painting fragments and wheat log “skrivnica” were discovered. Around the church there were traces of poorly preserved objects, probably belonging to the monastery residence or to the dining room.

According to the architectural features and analogy, the Regional Institute for Smederevo Monuments of Culture Protection published works on conservation and restoration of the church in 1990, which by that time had restored its liturgical and monastery function.